Vis enkel innførsel

dc.contributor.authorHoltsmark, Bjartnb_NO
dc.contributor.authorHagem, Cathrinenb_NO
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-17T14:30:01Z
dc.date.available2014-03-17T14:30:01Z
dc.date.issued1998nb_NO
dc.identifier.issn0804-4562nb_NO
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11250/192082
dc.description.abstractOn 11 December 1997, delegates to the third conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change agreed upon the Kyoto Protocol. The protocol sets binding emission targets for developed nations (Annex B countries). The Protocol states that Annex B countries may participate in emission trading. The rules for emission trading are to be discussed at the fourth Conference of the Parties in November 1998. differentiation of targets among countries, but not in any systematic manner. Our opinion is that a more systematic approach to differentiation will facilitate future negotiations. Future negotiations to determine national targets after 2012 are likely to occur, and sooner or later there will be a discussion of commitments for developing countries. More elaborated approaches and methods for differentiation will not solve all political differences and problems, but could be helpful and contribute a guiding framework for climate policy negotiations. Three sources of methods or proposals are employed. The first are proposals from the Ad Hoc Group on the Berlin Mandate (AGBM) process from 1995 until the Kyoto Protocol was adopted in December 1997. From this negotiation process we identified and selected all proposals that implied some type of differentiation of targets. Altogether this came to 17 proposals made by a single party or groups of parties. The second source is the European Community’s Triptique approach for differentiation of targets among its member states. The third source is recent academic literature, where we have included 8 contributions that we found interesting from the period 1992 to 1998. The proposals are presented in a catalogue style. Based on 4 criteria on the usefulness of proposals or methods for future negotiations we have chosen 5 proposals as representing the most interesting and promising contributions. These criteria are political acceptability, feasibility related to negotiations, regional or global relevance of method, and the potential for developing the method further. The most promising contributions are the second proposal by Japan, the French proposal, the Norwegian proposal, the Brazilian proposal further developed by the Dutch RIVM research institute, and finally, EU’s Triptique approach: The second Japanese proposal; where each party should reduce their emissions by 5% compared to 1990 levels. However, if emissions per unit of Gross Domestic Product (GDP), or emissions per capita, are lower than the average of all parties, the target is proportionally reduced. Likewise the target is proportionally reduced if population growth is higher than average. The French proposal; where targets are differentiated so that emission pathways converge to similar per capita or per unit of GDP levels by the end of the next century, with the aim of keeping atmospheric concentrations of CO2 below 550 ppmv. The Norwegian proposal; where each party’s percentage reduction target is distributed according to the weighted sum of the three indicators CO2 equivalent emissions per unit of GDP, GDP per capita, and CO2 equivalent emissions per capita, such that those parties that have higher than average values for these indicators also get a higher than average target, and vice versa. The Brazil-RIVM proposal; where targets are differentiated according to each party’s historical responsibility for global warming, in terms of accumulated contribution to radiative forcing in the atmosphere since the industrial revolution. EU’s Triptique approach; where the differences in emission-producing activities across the member states are accounted for through dividing each national economy into the three sectors electricity generation, energy-intensive industries, and other domestic sectors. In the electricity generation sector emissions are distributed according to minimum penetration of renewables, limits to fossil fuel use, and use of nuclear power. The energy-intensive industries are allowed to increase production at a constant rate based on the same energy-efficiency improvement rate. Finally, emissions from other domestic sectors are distributed on a per capita basis, to converge to the same future level. For the purpose of showing differentiation consequences of the selected methods, we supply some numerical illustrations for the Baltic Sea region. The countries in this region are the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden), the Baltic countries (Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania), in addition to Germany, Poland, and the Russian Federation. Given the joint Kyoto Protocol reduction target for the countries in the Baltic Sea region we compare the burden sharing consequences for one proposal or method across countries, and for one country across the methods or proposals. The comparison is based on the distribution of percentage emission reduction targets across the countries in the region. For the illustrations we employ the following fairness principles as differentiation methods: The Sovereignty principle; interpreted as reduction of emissions proportionally across all countries to maintain the relative emission level between them; The Egalitarian principle; interpreted as reduction of emissions in proportion to population (i.e. equal per capita emission); and The Ability to pay principle; interpreted as differentiation of climate targets such that the net abatement cost is positively correlated with per capita GDP. Furthermore, illustrations are given for the second Japanese proposal, the French proposal, and the Norwegian proposal. No illustrations are given for the Brazil-RIVM proposal and EU’s Triptique approach, since the required calculations would be outside the scope of this report. The results should only be taken as illustrations to illuminate differences between differentiation methods. Comparing the distribution of commitments across countries generated by the differentiation proposals we find that the span between the largest and smallest targets is much larger for the single fairness principles ‘Egalitarian’ and ‘Ability to pay’ than for the three proposals from the climate negotiations. In the latter three proposals Estonia and the Russian Federation have to reduce their emissions by much more than the average reduction for the Baltic Sea region countries of 6%. In the Norwegian proposal the heaviest burden falls on Poland. According to the French proposal Sweden and Iceland are allowed to increase their emissions due to a relatively low present emission level. The Nordic countries and Germany are allowed to increase their emissions substantially given the Egalitarian principle. However, given the Ability to pay principle these countries would get a much larger burden than the other countries. The results for proposals from the climate negotiations all lie between these extremes; that is between +9% (the French proposal for Sweden) and -12% (the French proposal for Estonia). With the aim to evaluate the political feasibility of the various differentiation methods we compare the results from chapter 6 across the countries in the Baltic Sea region, and divide them into OECD and EIT countries. Furthermore, we interpret the outcome of the Kyoto Protocol (and the internal differentiation scheme within the European Community) as an example of a politically feasible differentiation scheme, which may then serve as a benchmark for comparison with the differentiation methods evaluated here. On the basis of these observations we find that the Sovereignty and Egalitarian methods seem less interesting. The first method yields no differentiation, and the latter is too extreme in the short run since it equalises per capita emissions. Second, the Ability to pay method puts the largest burden on the OECD countries, whereas the Japan II proposal, the French proposal, and to some the degree the Norwegian proposal, put the largest burden on EIT countries. Third, all the methods explored provide Russia with a stricter target than the Kyoto Protocol, while the opposite situation is the case for Denmark and Germany. And finally, fourth, Japan II is the proposal that yields targets closest to the Kyoto Protocol, followed by the French and the Norwegian proposal. The three fairness principles based methods cause larger deviations from the Kyoto Protocol outcome. Consequently one might argue that a ranking of the differentiation methods according to political feasibility should be: 1. Japan II, 2. French, 3. Norwegian, 4. Ability to pay, 5. Sovereignty, and 6. Egalitarian. However, putting more emphasis on the second conclusion above, one might claim that the Ability to pay based method should have a higher ranking, and maybe be ranked in first place. The argument for this would be that it is unfair, and consequently also less politically feasible, to demand that the relatively poorer EIT countries should reduce their emissions by a larger percentage than the OECD countries. Among the countries in the Baltic Sea region Poland might be taken as proxy of a developing country due to its relatively low per capita GDP and its average per capita emissions of greenhouse gases. With this provision the most promising methods for involving developing countries seem to be based on the Ability to pay principle and the French proposal, since these methods are likely to yield relatively softer targets for developing countries. Samandrag 11. desember 1997 ble delegatene til klimakonvensjonens tredje partsmøte enige om teksten i Kyoto-protokollen. Protokollen setter bindende utslippsrestriksjoner for alle Anneks B- landene. Protokollen fastslår også at Anneks B-landene kan handle med utslippskvoter. Regler og retningslinjer for slik handel vil bli diskutert på det neste Partsmøtet i Buenos Aires i november 1998. Målet for denne rapporten er å diskutere den potensielle nytten av handel med kvoter samtidig som det blir reist noen kritiske spørsmål. Et viktig trekk ved kvotehandel er gevinstene i form av reduserte kostnader ved utslippsreduksjoner. Det numeriske eksempelet som presenteres i kapittel 7 i rapporten viser at de totale kostnadene av Kyoto-protokollen kan reduseres med omkring 95 prosent gjennom handel med kvoter. I et nordisk perspektiv er det viktig at Danmark, Norge og til en viss grad Sverige sannsynligvis er blant de Annex B- landene som vil tjene mest på slik handel. Finland ligger imidlertid ikke i samme grad an til tjene på handel med kvoter. Dette skyldes at de estimerte kostnadene ved å redusere utslippene er lavere i Finland enn i de andre nordiske landene. Handel med utslippskvoter er også aktuelt på det nasjonale plan. Kyoto-protokollen fordeler utslippsrettigheter (kvoter) til alle Anneks B-landene. Myndighetene i disse landene kan så vurdere om de ønsker å distribuere sine kvoter videre til nasjonale aktører i form av nasjonale kvoter. Dersom de velger å gjøre det, kan markeder for omsettbare kvoter oppstå nasjonalt så vel som internasjonalt. Potensialet for kostnadsreduksjoner er sannsynligvis stort også når det gjelder innenlandsk handel med kvoter. På det nasjonale plan kan en imidlertid oppnå en tilsvarende kostnadseffektiv løsning ved å innføre avgifter på utslipp. Det er i den forbindelse viktig å understreke at Kyoto-protokollen ikke legger noen restriksjoner på de enkelt lands valg av nasjonale virkemidler. Handel med kvoter på nasjonalt og internasjonalt nivå bør i stor grad diskuteres hver for seg. Det er lett å se at de nordiske landenes myndigheter vil ha mange grunner til å støtte handel med kvoter på internasjonalt nivå, selv om handel med kvoter ikke gjennomføres på nasjonalt nivå i disse landene. De nordiske landene har allerede innført karbonavgifter innenlands. Denne avgiftspolitikken kan opprettholdes samtidig som de nordiske lands myndigheter støtter og deltar i handelen på internasjonalt nivå. Selv om det er åpenbart at kvotehandel både kan redusere de nordiske landenes kostnader betydelig og være helt nødvendig for å få tilstrekkelig antall land til å ratifisere protokollen, er det enkelte uønskede effekter som ikke kan overses. Kyoto-protokollen tillater sannsynligvis noen land å slippe ut mere klimagasser enn det en kan anslå at deres "business as usual" (BAU) utslipp vil bli. Dette gjelder noen av landene med overgangsøkonomier (EIT-landene). Ubegrenset kvotehandel blant Anneks B landene vil da helt klart redusere de samlede utslippsreduksjoner sammenlignet med en situasjon hvor kvotene ikke er omsettelige. Vi omtaler dette som "hot air"- problemet i forbindelse med kvotehandel. Gevinster av kvotehandel Det er lagt til grunn at EUs samlede kvote er fordelt til medlemsstatene i overensstemmelse med den interne EU-fordelingen som det ble enighet om i juni 1998. Fire situasjoner er analysert. I den første tillates ikke kvotehandel. I den andre tillates kun de nordiske landene å handle med hverandre. I den tredje situasjonen utvider vi handelsregionen til å omfatte alle Annex II landene. Til slutt analyseres en situasjon hvor kvotehandel kan skje uhindret innen Annex B. I det siste tilfellet reduseres totalkostnadene til Annex B- landene med omkring 95 prosent sammenlignet med situasjonen uten handel. Spesielt Danmark, Norge, Canada, USA, Australia og EIT-landene vil få spesielt store gevinster av kvotehandel. Dette skyldes at disse landene enten har spesielt høye eller lave reduksjonskostnader eller en tøff/fleksibel utslippskvote. Land med mer gjennomsnittlige kostnader ved utslippsreduksjoner vil ikke i samme grad få nytteeffekter av handel. De relativt romslige utslippskvotene til Russland og Australia vil for eksempel trolig gi disse landene en stor grad av fleksibilitet og mulighet til å tjene på kvotesalg. Et grunnleggende resultat er at EIT-landene selger kvoter, mens de tradisjonelle markedsøkonomiene i tilfellet med fri handel samlet sett kjøper kvoter. Hvis det ikke settes begrensninger på handelen, kan derfor resultatet bli reduserte utslippsreduserende tiltak i de tradisjonelle markedsøkonomiene. Store såkalte "ikke-angre-tiltak" i EIT-landene er forklaringen på at EIT-landene er anslått å oppleve netto gevinst av en klimaavtale selv uten kvotehandel. Langsiktige konsekvenser av kvotehandel Det er viktig å være klar over at de globale utslippsreduksjonene som følger av Kyoto- protokollen er svært begrenset. Utslippene vil sannsynligvis fortsette å øke i de land som ikke inngår i Anneks B-gruppen så lenge ny fornybar energiproduksjon taper i konkurransen med fossile brensler. Et sentralt spørsmål er derfor hvordan en klimaavtale bør utformes for å oppmuntre til teknologisk utvikling innen ny fornybar energiproduksjon. Kvotehandel reduserer kostnadene ved utslippsreduksjon, som igjen vil redusere etterspørselen etter ikke-forurensende eller utslippseffektive teknologiske løsninger. Kvotehandel kan derfor komme til å redusere motivene for å satse på forskning og utvikling på disse områdene og kan følgelig også svekke den langsiktige miljøeffekten av en avtale. Anbefalinger - tiltak og virkemidler Rapporten anbefaler en kontrollert, gradvis innføring av kvotehandel gjennom ulike faser. Mulige alvorlige sideeffekter vil derved kunne oppdages i tide til å bli korrigert. I den første fasen anbefales visse begrensninger på handelen. De enkelte lands regjeringer bør tillates bare å selge en viss andel av sine kvoter. Størrelsen på denne andelen bør sees i forhold til de kontroll- og sanksjonsmekanismene som vil bli brukt. Ved slutten av første fase bør partskonferansen (COP) vurdere erfaringene fra mellomstatlig kvotehandel mellom Annex-B land. På bakgrunn av denne vurderingen kan COP avgjøre hvorvidt begrensningene på kvotehandelen kan gjøres mer romslige. Rapporten anbefaler at en internasjonal institusjon tillegges ansvaret for å godkjenne alt salg av kvoter. Alle overføringer av utslippskvoter over landegrenser bør følges opp med en rapport til ovennevnte institusjon. Disse rapportene må inneholde en plan fra landet som selger kvotene om hvordan det økte behovet for utslippsreduksjoner vil bli planlagt og gjennomført. På de nasjonale arenaer står valget mellom karbonavgifter og fordeling av omsettelige kvoter for CO2-utslipp. De nordiske landenes myndigheter bør utforske disse to alternativene videre. I forhold til erfaringene en allerede har med karbonavgifter er dette sannsynligvis det virkemiddelet som bør foretrekkes i disse landene. Hvis mange land i den første fasen innfører kvotehandelssystemer på de nasjonale arenaer bør en i andre fase vurdere om disse markedene kan integreres. På denne måten kan det utvikles mellomstatlig handel både med myndigheter og næringsliv som aktører. De nasjonale regjeringer bør likevel være ansvarlig for at den samlede nasjonale målsettingen nås. På dette stadiet kan land utenfor Annex B inviteres til å akseptere utslippsbegrensninger for å være i stand til å slutte seg til kvotemarkedet. Oversikt over rapporten Kapittel 3 utdyper blant annet den foreslåtte gradvise innføringen av kvotehandel. Kapittel 4 beskriver hvordan markeder for kvotehandel kan bygges opp og fungere. Kapittel 5 diskuterer fordeler og ulemper ved kvotehandel både på nasjonalt og internasjonalt nivå. Kapittel 6 diskuterer potensiell nytte av kvotehandel i lys av andre empirisk baserte studier. Kapittel 7 presenterer noen numeriske eksempler for å illustrere hvordan kvotehandel kan påvirke de ulike landenes totale reduksjonskostnader og kostnader relatert til endringer i handelsregimer som følger når mange land gjennomfører tiltak samtidig. Kapittel 8 gir en kort gjennomgang av andre studier og erfaringer med kvotehandel. Fotnoter 5) Annex B land er de som er listet opp i Annex B i Kyoto protokollen (OECD-landene (untatt Korea, Mexico og Tyrkia), EU, som er en egen part til klimakonvensjonen, land med overgangsøkonomier og Liechtenstein og Monaco). 6) Beregningene er utført med en modell utviklet ved CICERO. En tidligere versjon av modellen er nærmere beskrevet i Holtsmark (1997). Se også Ringius, Torvanger and Holtsmark (1998) for en annen anvendelse av denne modellen. 7) Kvotene for Danmark,Finland og Sverige er 79, 100 og 104 prosent av de respektive 1990-utslippene. Det faktum at Danmark må redusere utslippene betydelig fra 1990 til den første forpliktelsesperioden, samtidig som Finland og Sverige bare må stabilisere eller svakt kan øke utslippene i denne perioden, forklarer for en stor del hvorfor Danmark i henhold til beregningene må regne med betydelige nettokostnader som følge av Kyoto-protokollen, mens Finland og Sverige er antatt å slippe billigere fra det. 8) Annex II land er de som er listet opp i Annex II i klimakonvensjonen (OECD-landene pr. 1992 og EU).nb_NO
dc.language.isoengnb_NO
dc.publisherCICERO Center for International Climate and Environmental Research - Oslonb_NO
dc.relation.ispartofCICERO Reportnb_NO
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCICERO Report;1998:01nb_NO
dc.titleEmission trading under the Kyoto Protocolnb_NO
dc.typeResearch reportnb_NO
dc.source.pagenumbernb_NO


Tilhørende fil(er)

Thumbnail

Denne innførselen finnes i følgende samling(er)

Vis enkel innførsel