Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKasa, Sjurnb_NO
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-17T14:28:48Z
dc.date.available2014-03-17T14:28:48Z
dc.date.issued1999nb_NO
dc.identifier.issn0804-4511nb_NO
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11250/191820
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, I present the story of several attempts to tax Norwegian mainland emission intensive industries during the 1990s. These industries, mainly made up of aluminium and ferro-alloy producers located in the Norwegian countryside, and a series of planned gas-powered power stations along the coast, have enjoyed full exemption from CO2-taxes during a period in which realtively high CO2-taxes have been imposed on Norwegian consumers and some other industries. The various sources of the superior power of the emission intensive industries are explored, included their ability to amass broad support for "pro-industrial" social norms among politicians, media and the bureaucracy. Theoretically, these capabilities are described in terms of the policy network approach developed in British political science.nb_NO
dc.language.isoengnb_NO
dc.publisherCICERO Center for International Climate and Environmental Research - Oslonb_NO
dc.relation.ispartofCICERO Policy Notenb_NO
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCICERO Policy Note;1999:05nb_NO
dc.titleSocial and political barriers to green tax reform: The case of CO2-taxes in Norwaynb_NO
dc.typeWorking papernb_NO
dc.source.pagenumbernb_NO


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record